Japanese design philosophy has slowly but surely taken the world by storm – ever since it was discovered by the rest of us! There’s something surreal and relaxing about Japanese-inspired products that just makes you want to introduce a little minimalism into your life. Whether it’s furniture designs, stationery or even kitchen appliances, we bring you a collection of innovative Japanese designs. From Japanese geometric scissors that double as quirky designs to high-quality Japanese towels – these surreal and soothing product designs are all you need to introduce into your daily life, to experience Japanese zen and peace. .

1. Outside

Outside In is a multi-functional, shape-shifting table that incorporates hand-carved grooves into its wooden frame to resemble the raked ruts of Japanese Zen gardens.

Why is this remarkable?

Japanese Zen gardens have provided endless inspiration for designers. While the sheer meditative quality of zen gardens is enough to provide insight into new ideas, the artful design of zen gardens rakes in its own creative vision for designers. Sabu Studio, a Melbourne-based furniture, lighting and object design company, found its own creative vision through Japanese Zen gardens when designing the minimalist Outside In table.

What we like

  • Features a winding wooden surface that resembles the hand-crafted grooves of a Zen garden.
  • Outside In is a clever piece of furniture that would find its place in the common areas of the hotel industry or even in event rooms.

What we don’t like

2. Trisqucle Scissors

Trisqucle scissors come in different forms than the regular scissors we see. There is a pair of scissors in the shape of a triangle, a square and a circle, where the name trisqucle probably comes from. In addition to cutting objects, the accessories can also be used as shape templates with different sizes of circles and as a ruler and compass in case you need them for your office or school work.

Why is this remarkable?

These unique looking scissors have apparently been around since the 80s and were created by the Japanese, who of course are known for their quite unique products. But after a long “hiatus”, the Trisqucle is now back and is now called Shape Scissors and is distributed by a British stationery brand called Present & Correct.

What we like

  • Scissors double as original accessories

What we don’t like

  • Not everyone may find this product useful

3. The Furoshiki denim bag

Sometimes we have to take the hard-learned lessons of the past to heart in order to create something beautiful, durable, and most importantly, long-lasting. That’s the message Blue Ainery’s Compact Furoshiki Denim Bag tries to send by using traditional dyeing and weaving methods to create a fashionable storage accessory whose very design pays homage to history and tradition. the tradition of Japan, many of which still apply today.

Why is this remarkable?

Almost everything about the Furoshiki denim bag is a nod to Japanese culture, design and fashion. The term “furoshiki” itself refers to the traditional Japanese wrapping of fabrics for merchandise, bento boxes, and informal gifts. When worn as a bag, the Furoshiki looks more like an “Azuma Fukuro” that predated modern tote bags by about four centuries.

What we like

  • It has a minimalist charm
  • Its simple shape leaves enough space for many objects inside

What we don’t like

  • Design may seem basic and dated to some

4. Japarcana Imabari Towels

Premium towels, however, don’t need to cost an arm and a leg, nor do they need to look extravagant. In Japanese culture and design, simple, understated solutions are often best, and these Japarcana Imabari towels prove it.

Why is this remarkable?

The Japanese towel industry based in Imabari has long since solved this problem, and Japarcana wants to bring it to the rest of the world. Simple, time-tested weaving techniques, high-quality cotton, and strict quality standards come together to create a towel with excellent water absorption, soft texture, and long-lasting durability. These towels have the imabari stamp of approval, something not just given to any brand of towels.

What we like

  • The towel label uses an ukiyo-e illustration depicting traditional Japanese baths, clearly indicating the towel’s main function

What we don’t like

5. The Japanese Cypress Vās Wood Diffuser

The Japanese Cypress Vās Wood Diffuser requires no electricity, power or batteries to diffuse your favorite essential oils. All you need is to put in a few drops and wait for it to do its natural “magic”. The design is inspired by the Latin word for a vessel which is vās, normally used to hold flowers.

Why is this remarkable?

The vase itself is handcrafted from Japanese hinoki cypress, giving you not only a natural oil diffuser, but also a decorative piece to match your wooden theme if you have one.

What we like

  • Portable and travel-friendly

What we don’t like

6. Le Chouchin

The Chouchin is a pillar-shaped candle, designed to look like a traditional Japanese “chouchin” lantern.

Why is this remarkable?

The candle is made from two different grades of wax, one on the inside, which burns like a normal candle, and one on the outside, which serves as the candle’s exterior, mimicking the effects of a wooden lantern. diffusing the light that passes through. As the inner wax candle continues to burn, the flame shines through the outer shell, diffusing in soft, warm light in the process.

What we like

  • The outer shell uses a patented non-melting wax, which imparts a nice subtle translucency to the candle as the wick burns downward.
  • Inside is a more traditional candle, with a burn time of 60 hours – providing a few months of light with daily use

What we don’t like

7. The Ofuro bathtub

Ofuro bathtub

Antoniolupi’s latest product, the Ofuro series, stems from the traditional Japanese bath that involves soaking and relaxation.

Why is this remarkable?

The use of the name provides the inspiration to create a truly soothing and comforting bathing experience. Showers may not be enough, so bathtubs are preferred in certain situations where you really need to relax and decompress. A few moments in the bathtub not only purify the body but also the soul and the spirit, because this is where you can free yourself from all the stress and worries of the day.

What we like

  • The Ofuro series by Antoniolupi is an answer to such a need for well-being and healthy living
  • The idea of ​​total immersion in warm water is why the Ofuro tub is large, resembling a large basin perched in the corner of the bathroom, just like the Japanese tradition.

What we don’t like

8. Electric wands

Electric wands

Information about electric wands

Innovations and wand redesigns have been showcased, but nothing like this project presented together by Kirin Holdings and the Miyashita Laboratory (Meiji University Dr. Homei Miyashita Laboratory of the Department of Frontier Media Science, School of Interdisciplinary Mathematical Sciences). The chopsticks device comes with an electrical stimulation waveform that works together to adjust the taste of low sodium foods.

Why is this remarkable?

Chopsticks can make foods that are low in sodium taste salty. So you can enjoy the food more, but without the high sodium content. This idea may benefit those on a low-sodium diet. Currently, chopsticks can be used, but other utensils can also take advantage of the system. Improvement of the salty taste is possible with electrical stimulation on a utensil. Aiming to improve electric taste sensation, more people can enjoy what they eat even with reduced salt content.

What we like

  • The device uses a weak electrical current to deliver sodium ions from food to the mouth
  • Creates a feeling of salinity

What we don’t like

  • It is still at the prototype stage!

9. The Japanese paper notepad

Japanese Memo Block paper comes to provide temporary shelter for your wandering thoughts.

Why is this remarkable?

There’s nothing more welcoming and freeing than a blank sheet of paper ready to record those fleeting thoughts, those flashes of inspiration, or even those tasks that have suddenly been thrown into your lap. With no other markings, not even grids or lines, this white notepad lets you focus on the easiest task at hand, jotting down that note before you get distracted again. And with its small footprint, it’s easy to place a pad of paper anywhere on your desk, in any position or orientation, so it’s always close at hand when your Muse or colleague visits. visit.

What we like

  • Its pure black surface challenges the mind as if daring to put an unconventional and exciting new thought on paper
  • Uses high quality Japanese paper revered by many stationery connoisseurs

What we don’t like

10. The Wooden Pen Holder

There’s something almost poetic about picking up a brush or fountain pen from an inkwell, drawing your strokes, and dipping it back in to be ready for the next inspiration, a feeling that’s almost lost even with the most elaborate and extravagant pens today. Not unless you have a pen holder that brings back that vibe, like a block of wood that might be the most zen pen holder to ever grace your desk.

Why is this remarkable?

This wooden block is both unassuming and, at the same time, beautiful in its simplicity, as many minimalist products often are. Crafted from real maple wood, each piece has grains and patterns that make it unique and special. Without saying it explicitly, it’s the assurance that each black will be one of a kind, giving you the feeling that this pen holder was designed just for you. Paired with an equally stylish pen, this pad transforms any desk into a thinker’s workbench, where the tools of the trade are at your fingertips.

What we like

  • The wooden pen holder has a gently curved depression that can accommodate any standard sized pen.
  • When you pick up the pen, you almost believe that the ink will also follow it from an invisible well of ideas

What we don’t like