By Express press service

KOCHI: Srav, a solar-powered offshore fishing vessel designed and developed by Kochi-based NavAlt Solar and Electric Boats, has won the iconic Gustave Trouve Award for becoming the world’s first offshore solar-powered fishing vessel.

The prestigious awards were instituted in memory of Gustave Trouve, the famous French inventor, electrical engineer, physicist and polymath. The Electric Boat Award – Commercial ferry category was dominated by nominations from some of the biggest boat builders from 30 countries.

A total of four disputed vessels from India, three of which belonged to NavAlt. Srav has been voted the “Best Electric Workboat” in the world, according to a statement here.

This is the second time that NavAlt has won the global award. Previously, NavAlt’s 75-seat solar-powered ferry Aditya, which operates on the Vaikom-Thavanakadavu route, won the Gustave Prize in 2020.

Sandith Thandassery, Founder and CEO of NavAlt, said Srav is being manufactured in the company’s seagoing vessel series which will encompass all types of small and large fishing vessels, all powered by the Sun.

The story of the electric Srav began with NavAlt’s dream of cleaner, quieter oceans. “Starting from Aditya, a marvel of technology and design, we ventured into the construction of ro-ro ships, luxury ships and military boats,” Sandith said.

As the company focused on setting up various green ships across India, the Shell Foundation, one of the biggest cleantech advocates today, came with unwavering support, it said. he declares. The Shell found that solar fishing boats could have a huge impact on the country’s fishing community.

Surveys have indicated that there are almost 250,000 fishing vessels running on gasoline and kerosene. Millions of people who depend on the sea and its products rely on these vessels for deep-sea fishing – both in its physical structure and in its unitary economy.

The rising price of fossil fuels is a big concern for the community as they operate with very low margins on the catch they receive minus the eye-watering fuel costs.

“Srav is a fascinating beast to ride. It can accommodate up to six anglers. It has a range of 50 km and is ideal for small anglers. Rs 3 lakh. The wear and tear too will be much less,” Sandith said. “Plus, the Srav is super stable and super quiet,” he added.

The Shell Foundation is supporting NavAlt to introduce solar-powered aquatic beasts to the fishing community, forever ridding them of the burden of fuel costs and at the same time introducing them to the new form of fishing.

NavAlt will deploy many Sravs to the west coast of India, allowing the fishing community to benefit greatly from the “reduction” in operational expenses.

KOCHI: Srav, a solar-powered offshore fishing vessel designed and developed by Kochi-based NavAlt Solar and Electric Boats, has won the iconic Gustave Trouve Award for becoming the world’s first offshore solar-powered fishing vessel. The prestigious awards were instituted in memory of Gustave Trouve, the famous French inventor, electrical engineer, physicist and polymath. The Electric Boat Award – Commercial ferry category was dominated by nominations from some of the biggest boat builders from 30 countries. A total of four disputed vessels from India, three of which belonged to NavAlt. Srav has been voted the “Best Electric Workboat” in the world, according to a statement here. This is the second time that NavAlt has won the global award. Earlier, NavAlt’s 75-seat solar-powered ferry Aditya which operates in the Vaikom-Thavanakadavu route had won the Gustave Prize in 2020. Sandith Thandassery, Founder and CEO of NavAlt, said Srav is part of the series of the company’s seagoing vessels which will encompass all types of small and large fishing vessels, all powered by the sun. The story of the electric Srav began with NavAlt’s dream of cleaner, quieter oceans. “Starting from Aditya, a marvel of technology and design, we ventured into the construction of ro-ro ships, luxury ships and military boats,” Sandith said. green ships all over India, the Shell Foundation, one of the biggest advocates of clean technologies today, has been providing unwavering support, he said. Shell found that solar fishing boats could have a huge impact on the country’s fishing community. Surveys have indicated that there are almost 250,000 fishing vessels running on gasoline and kerosene. Millions of people who depend on the sea and its products rely on these vessels for deep-sea fishing – both in its physical structure and in its unitary economy. The rising price of fossil fuels is a big concern for the community as they operate with very low margins on the catch they receive minus the eye-watering fuel costs. “Srav is a fascinating beast to ride. It can accommodate up to six anglers. It has a range of 50 km and is ideal for small anglers. Rs 3 lakh. The wear and tear too will be much less,” Sandith said. “Plus, the Srav is super stable and super quiet,” he added. The Shell Foundation is supporting NavAlt to introduce solar-powered aquatic beasts to the fishing community, forever ridding them of the burden of fuel costs and at the same time introducing them to the new form of fishing. NavAlt will deploy many Sravs to the west coast of India, allowing the fishing community to greatly benefit from the “reduction” in operational expenses.